HILLARY CLINTON: AH, THOSE “LITTLE GIRLS” (HEAR THEM ROAR)!

Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton arrives to speak during her California primary night rally held in the Brooklyn borough of New York, U.S. on June 7, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson/File Photo

J. Stewart Cook’s Canadian Commentary

Without going into a long diatribe about the “uniqueness” of this election and its “composition,” I couldn’t help but think…”How did Hillary Clinton and the Democrats ever loose?” We all know that the US citizens wanted change, but was it change that Donald Trump was espousing. Maybe some tweaking would have done the job! Nevertheless, we were all stunned when we saw Hillary and company fall off the political precipice.

In one of my previous articles, I cited French singer/actor Maurice Chevalier’s song “Thank Heaven for Little Girls, (they grow up in the most delightful way).” In her concession speech, Hillary also cited “little girls,” from a different perspective, in the context of growing up and reaching your full potential.

“And to all of the little girls who are watching this, never doubt that you are valuable and powerful and deserving of every chance and opportunity in the world to pursue and achieve your own dreams.”

And what about “little boys,” “big girls,” “big boys,” what about American citizens in general? By extension, not exaggeration, her phrase regarding “little girls,” may have been applied to all American citizens regardless of their age. “And to all…who are watching this,…” One realizes that Hillary was specifically addressing her own gender and young girls. It is cute, endearing, “motherly” and sends a strong message. However, Hillary’s entire overture, be it to little girls, women, men, minorities, be it about the state of the economy, the social and justice systems, national and international affairs etc., seemed to reflect a world of innocence in which “Mother” Hillary would take care of everything.

It is a nice phrase, but no longer applicable in today’s society. Little girls are no longer the “little girls” Hillary envisions. She has not accepted the fact that they have grown up and matured. “Little girls” no longer need to be reminded of their life aspirations! Perhaps a little too condescending or patronizing, perhaps a little too “Hillary!”

In 1971, singer Helen Reddy released a song tilted, “I Am Woman (Here Me Roar).” The song came near the apex of the counterculture era and, by celebrating female empowerment, became an enduring anthem for the women’s liberation movement. Interestingly enough, Reddy expanded by saying…” “It’s not just for women…it’s a general empowerment song about feeling good about yourself, believing in yourself…” Had Hillary been running for President in the early seventies, she would have been the perfect candidate. She would have had the vision to take, not only women, but all citizens, to even a “higher apex” beyond that of the nineteen seventies. It wasn’t meant to be!

Hillary, and most democrats, did not read the US audience. Or, perhaps, they did but change was not in their mandate at this time. Having a woman running for the Oval Office was sufficient enough to stay the course that Obama had set and capitalize on his legacy. A ten dollar haircut, with a little bit off here and a little bit off there would have kept the US citizens content and under control. However, her slogan, “Stronger Together,” simply did not say enough to satisfy the electorate. They wanted some indication that Hillary was truly going to make a difference in their lives!

On the other hand, Donald Trump new it was time for change and ran with his slogan “Make America Great Again.” The citizens finally had a voice and it was heard loudly and clearly. But wait, would that not mean going back to the fifties/sixties when everything was….just like “Happy Days.” To a certain extent, yes. But, realistically speaking, it was to move forward and take back what the USA had lost over the years, nationally and internationally.

The American citizens made a choice and gave Donald Trump the opportunity to “Make America Great Again.” Undoubtedly, he will have to prove to the people that he can, not only, make America great again, but even better than what it has been for the past several decades!

There is no doubt that Hillary Clinton exemplified Helen Reddy’s song, “I Am Woman.” On the lighter side, in a 1975 episode of The Carol Burnett Show, guest Jean Stapleton played a feminist who proudly announces, “I am woman!” to which Harvey Korman’s character replies, “I know. I heard your roar.”

But, more to the point, during the 2000 Republican presidential campaign of Elizabeth Dole, one GOP consultant complained that, “she has to have a message beyond ‘I am woman, hear me roar.” Regrettably, Hillary’s “roarin'” was not what the American electorate wanted to hear. For one thing…IT WAS CERTAINLY NOT ABOUT CHANGE!